BRINGING MICRO HYDRO ENERGY TO REMOTE VILLAGES

SMALL HYDRO: TAPPING INTO EUROPE’S HYDROPOWER INFRASTRUCTURE POTENTIAL
June 7, 2019
BENEFITS OF MICRO HYDRO
June 7, 2019

 

Gaining access to electricity or any other source of energy in a remote village can be next to impossible, unless a significant expense is incurred. The problem is that many people living in remote villages throughout third world countries do not have these types of funds. Even if they did, spending money to bring energy to the area in which they live by installing power distribution lines may not be the way to go. Construction such as this can often have a devastating environmental impact. It is for this reason many remote villages and people without access to electricity are considered to be ideal customers for solar or wind power.

What people in these areas may not know is hydropower can also be a sustainable energy source for outlying villages and remote communities. In fact, micro hydro systems and HydroFarms can play a significant role in supplying power without having to install distribution poles and lines, needing the sun to shine 24 hours a day, or requiring the wind to blow. All that would be needed is a source of flowing water from an existing canal, river, dam or tidal flow. It doesn’t need to be a massive flow either, two inches of moving water can be all it takes to keep the waterwheel running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

A bank of batteries and a DC charging station could then be centrally installed as a place where the collected energy would be stored. The batteries get charged by the micro hydro output and villagers use the charging station to power cell phones, electronic devices and even small LED lights. Excess power has the potential to be redirected for use in community ice makers, water purification systems and other vital systems.

Energy generated through the micro hydro systems, or HydroFarms, is cost-effective as well as being clean and safe. With our patented, sustainable technologies, remote villages in far away parts of the world could quickly gain access to zero emission energy.